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Graduate Thesis, Capstone Project, and Dissertation Style Guide

The style guide for Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertations at Dominican University of California

Creating an Accessible Thesis

People who have vision, hearing, or speech disabilities (“communication disabilities”) use different ways to communicate. For example, people who are blind may give and receive information audibly rather than in writing and people who are deaf may give and receive information through writing or sign language rather than through speech.

For people who are blind, have vision loss, or are deaf-blind, this includes providing a qualified reader; information in large print, Braille, or electronically for use with a computer screen-reading program; or an audio recording of printed information. A “qualified” reader means someone who is able to read effectively, accurately, and impartially, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.

From:

Video: An Introduction to Screen Readers

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