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CSE Citation Style: CSE Citation Style

Links to helpful sites for CSE (Council of Science Editors) Style

Helpful Guides

Use one of these guides for help with CSE style:

Citation Generators

What is CSE Style?

The Council of Science Editors (CSE) style is designed for the general sciences including biology. You need to cite your sources in two places within your paper: in-text and bibliography.

The official page for the Scientific Style and Format, 8th edition, can be accessed here: http://www.scientificstyleandformat.org/Tools.html

CSE Style offers three ways to cite a source. Double-check with your professor to be sure you are using the correct one. 

  • Citation-Sequence (C-S) system which uses numbers within the text to refer to the end references which are listed in the order they are referred to in the text. Subsequent citations to the same document use the same number as its initial citation:
     
    In text example: Modern scientific nomenclature really began with Linnaeus in botany1, but other disciplines2,3were not many years behind in developing various systems4-7 for nomenclature and symbolization
     
  • Citation-Name (C-N) system which uses numbers within the text to refer to the end references which are listed alphabetically by author and then by title.:

    In text example: Modern scientific nomenclature really began with Linnaeus in botany4, but other discipline1,5were not many years behind in developing various systems2-3,6,10 for nomenclature and symbolization
     
  • Name-Year (N-Y) system which uses the surname of the author and the year of publication to refer to the end references which are then listed alphabetically by author and then by year:
     
    In text example: By contrast, the several antisera that have been raised against Sp1, a defined RNA polymerase II transcription factor (Kadonaga 1986), stain exclusively the nucleus . . .
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